Slopped shingled Commercial roofing system

Commercial Roof Systems (Updated)

Updated Feb 15, 2020
Originally Published: April 23, 2017

Commercial Roof Systems

Whether you are constructing a new commercial building or need to replace the roofing on an existing structure, it is important to understand the different types of commercial roofing systems so that you can make the right choice for your business. Unlike residential roofing, commercial roofing has very specific requirements because commercial buildings are usually larger and taller. The roofing material you choose will determine the life of your building and the safety of the residents.

Low Slope Roofing

The roof you choose for your commercial property depends entirely on the degree of slope of the roof. Materials that work on low slope roofs are not always the best choice for high slope roofs. The following are options to consider for a low slope roof

Ethylene Propylene Diene Terpolymer Roofing (EPMD):

EPDM roofing is a type of rubber roofing made from a combination of ethylene and propylene. EPDM roofing is extremely versatile and is known for its durability. EPDM is the longest lasting type of commercial roofing available on the market and can easily last up to 40 years with the right environmental conditions and routine maintenance. They are easy to maintain and repair, and have a simple clean look.

Thermoplastic Roofing (TPO):

TPO roof systems

are becoming extremely popular in commercial construction because of their cost effectiveness and functionality. TPO roofs are made from a durable material which stands up in high and low temperatures making them a good option for any climate. They are impervious to ultraviolet rays, chemical exposure, and the ozone as well as being resistant to punctures, fire, and damage from high winds. On average a TPO roof lasts over twenty years and can withstand even the harshest environments.

Polyvinyl Chloride Roofing (PVC):

PVC roofing

is similar to TPO roofing and is also an excellent choice for commercial properties. PVC roofing is created by using sheets of PVC that contain plasticizers and stabilizers. They are available with a fleece backing that helps insulate the building. Like TPO roofs there are extremely durable and can withstand a full range of temperatures. They can withstand damage from punctures, fire, ultraviolet rays, chemical exposure, and other harsh environmental factors. With a wide range of colours to choose from, they are a popular choice.

Built-Up Roof Membranes (BUR):

BUR

are commonly referred to as “tar and gravel roofs” and are one of the oldest styles of commercial roofing. This system is created through layering. Flat roofs can be single-ply or built-up using multiple layers of liquid tar or asphalt over tar/asphalt saturated paper; or have multiple layers of other types of waterproof membranes. This is topped with a layer of pea-size gravel to protect the tar from the elements. The lifespan of a BUR roof depends on the materials used and the thickness of the layers but they have been known to last up to 50 years.

Steep Slope Roofing

If you have a steep slope roof (greater than 4/12 pitch) on your property, you need a roofing material that works with your architecture. The following options should be considered when dealing with a high slope roof:

Roof Shingles:

Shingle roofs

are one of the oldest roofing systems and are still very common across North America. Shingles are a roof covering made up of individual overlapping sections laid in courses from the bottom edge of the roof up. Each successive course overlaps the joint below, creating a layered, water shedding system. Shingles are available in various materials such as asphalt, wood, tile, metal, plastic, fibre cement, and flagstone. The durability of your shingle roof will depend on the type of material you select.

Asphalt Shingles:

Asphalt shingles

are a water shedding system, and a great option for high or steep sloped roofs. Asphalt shingle roofing starts with a layer of base material followed by a sturdy felted fabric upon which the shingles are layered. Depending on the type of asphalt shingles chosen they have warranties ranging from 20 years to a lifetime. This option is easy to maintain and offers a wide variety of colour options.

Cedar Shakes/Shingle:

Wood shingles and shakes

are a favoured roofing option due to their beautiful colouring, durability, and natural insulating properties. This differs from shakes, which are made by splitting pieces of wood from a bolt. Wood shingles and shakes come in a variety of distinctive patterns and materials. Cedar wood is a popular choice for shakes and shingles. Cedar can be expensive up front and requires regular maintenance. However, cedar roofs are durable, lasting up to 10 years longer than asphalt roofing, and are resistant to heavy rains, hail storms, snowstorms, and strong winds. They are also a natural insulator, making them an eco-friendly, energy efficient option.

Tile Roofing:

There are two types of tile roofing available for commercial applications: concrete and clay tile. Both concrete and clay tile are very attractive roofing options. Not only are they beautiful, they are incredibly durable, especially against environmental factors like high winds, dramatic temperature changes, the ozone and ultraviolet rays. Tile roofing can last 50 years with the right maintenance so they have a long-term cost benefit.

Metal Roofing:

There are three types of metal roofing available for steep slope applications: architectural metal panel, structural metal panel, and metal shingles. Metal roofing is a very good option in areas experiencing heavy rains or snow as they are designed to help direct precipitation off the roof. With minimal maintenance, a metal roof can last 60 years or more making it a cost-effective choice.

Synthetic Roofing:

Synthetic roofing

is a catch-all term that describes manufactured products that replicate asphalt shingles, concrete tile, clay tile, metal panels, slate, wood shakes and wood shingles. Synthetic roof coverings contain recycled plastic and/or rubber as a key ingredient, making them significantly lighter than other roofing materials, and eco-friendly. They are mould, hail and fire resistant and can be less expensive than some of the other options. Depending on the type of synthetic roof you choose, they can last as long as 100 years.

Picking The Right Commercial Roof

With so many options, it can be a bit daunting to decide which commercial roofing option is right for you. Luckily, the experts at Cambie Roofing are here to help. We have over 50 years of experience installing commercial roofing and will help you pick the roofing that is right for your building and your business needs. Call us today to discuss which roofing option is right for your commercial property.

bob-ricca-8V7ItC2M5JU-unsplash

Roofing Tips For The Winter

Winter is definitely here in Vancouver and as you all know, the harsh conditions can cause damage and decrease the longevity of your home’s roof. If your roof needs repairs, it’s generally better to do them in the drier months. In fact, most experts say the best time to do work on a roof is from July to August when the weather is best. In a perfect world, summer would be great to finish all those projects, but your roof doesn’t just leak during those months.
In British Columbia, where the weather is often unpredictable, these ideal conditions can be few and far between. Most roofing companies have to consider how they can perform a roofing job in the winter, in less than ideal conditions.
While not always the best, roof construction and repair can be done in cold weather, as long as precautions are taken. In winter, roofers face a variety of challenges including:

  • Roofing materials don’t work quite as well as they do in moderate temperatures.
  • Shorter days give roofers less time to work which generally means the project takes longer.
  • Tools such as nail guns generally don’t work as well in the cold.
  • Snow and ice can create hazards or cover up dangers to roofers.

 
What to Expect When Roofing in Winter
Roofing in winter weather requires a lot more foresight, planning and safety precautions than summer days. Be aware that some companies will charge you up to 20% more for their services, while other companies will be looking for work and might give you a discount. Whatever you do, you should shop around and get between three to five quotes and ask them specifically about their winter work.
 
Winter Safety Is The Most Important
Safety is obviously the most important thing when it comes to roofing – no matter what time of year. Under no circumstances should you hire a company that doesn’t take safety serious as there are some unique cold weather issues to be aware of when doing winter roofing work.
For example, roof surfaces can become slippery thanks to snow, ice, and frost. A common winter problem is snow removal or de-icing of the roof surface must be done after a snowstorm. The roofers must take extra precaution and use specialized equipment, which they need to be trained on, along with increased monitoring while the removal is taking place.
Snow can also disguise dangers such as skylights, debris and other risks. The roofing contractor needs to pay close attention to where they walk to ensure they don’t accidentally step on or fall through a skylight or trip over hazards hidden under snow. Even on a freshly cleared roof, there may be black ice or frost build-up on the roof or deck surface, which can make work extremely dangerous. If the temperature is too cold and the snow and ice remain, it is best to wait until the weather warms up.
Another thing to do before getting a roofing contractor to work is to ensure that the attic space is adequately ventilated. Often, what appears to be a roof leak is actually condensation from interior air drifting up into a cold, improperly ventilated attic.
 
Working in the Winter
Working in cold, damp temperatures can put a strain on the body, making your heart and lungs work harder, while at the same time putting you at increased risk for hypothermia or frostbite. Be aware roofers, as mentioned before, will work shorter hours, and plan around the sunshine and weather forecasts. Be prepared for work stoppage and delays because of the weather.
Roof contractors should also wear warm clothing that is breathable but also provides an ample range of motion. If you notice that a roofer isn’t appropriately dressed, do not let them work.
 
The Weigh Of Your Roof
Another thing to consider is the extra weight that snow and ice can add to a roof. If you add a human’s weight into the mix, you can potentially be looking at serious injury. A roofer must ensure that the surface he is working on is sturdy and safe from collapse. An experienced roofer will test the structure before beginning to work on it to ensure that there is no danger from collapse.
 
Equipment and Materials
Now you know what to expect in the winter, you also have to keep in mind the quality of craftsmanship which can suffer if the roofer is inexperienced.
 
Asphalt shingles
The best temperatures to install asphalt shingles is between 4 and 26 degrees Celsius. If a roofer decides to install roofing shingles in cold weather below these temperatures, your shingles may become brittle and more prone to breakage. To prevent this, when working in below-zero temperatures, make sure the roofer stores your materials in a warm place until you need them. Shingles will mould to the shape of the surface they rest on, so if you are buying them before using them, keep them flat, stacked and raised on pallets so they don’t touch the ground. Be aware that a roofer should not work in below-zero temperatures unless it is an emergency situation that needs fixing.
 
Types of Roofing Materials
Most roofing organizations recommend using winter weather membranes to seal your eaves, valleys, skylights, and vents, rather than warm weather roll roofing, which can buckle or warp when applied in cold weather. When you choose to use any kind of felt or membrane, the roofer will roll it out in a staging area, away from the elements and allow it to relax before you apply. This will help reduce wrinkles caused by the weather.
 
Conclusion
The information in this blog is intended to be a starting point for cold weather roofing applications. Each situation is different and as always consult a professional roofer before starting. If you have any questions, then please don’t hesitate to contact us at Cambie Roofing to schedule a free roofing estimate.
 

skylight-leak

How to Prevent a Skylight Leak

Skylights are incredibly beautiful and can add some much-needed light to your home. Having additional natural light skylights can also look to expand interior spaces, reduce utility bills, and help make your home seem a little more inviting.
The problem is, however, that skylights, especially when installed poorly, can be prone to developing water leaks. In fact, skylight leaks are among the most common roof repairs in residential homes. When a skylight starts to leak, it can be minor but can lead to expensive water damage, especially if it goes unchecked. A leaky skylight can also be an indication of other, more serious, hidden roof damage. You can contain and prevent skylight leaks by asking a roofing contractor to perform a regular roof inspection.

What Causes Skylights to Leak?

The first question to ask is what causes a skylight to leak. As with most things, it can be a variety of factors. Some people blame leaks on faulty product design but usually, it’s the skylight wasn’t installed or maintained properly. Sometimes it can be a combination of several factors including old age.

How To Spot a Leak

If you’re indoors, you might not even have to step outside to see if there is a leak around the skylight. If you see a dark spot around the skylight you need to distinguish whether it is a true leak or just built up condensation – moisture on the cool skylight surface. Depending on the skylight design, especially modern ones, some of them have condensation drip trays that collect extra moisture.
The best way to determine a skylight leak is to do it from a vantage point indoors. Look very closely at where water stains originate inside the building – trace stains to their highest point. The leak will likely be at the highest point from the wet spot.
Homeowners can have trouble determining exactly where the skylight leak is occurring, sometimes simply slather caulk or roof cement all over everything in sight. This is obviously not the best way to do it and can not only value your home but also can cause lasting damage. In addition, when professional roofers are called in, a roof-cement slathered skylight that is still leaking may be even more difficult to diagnose.
If the skylight leak is at the roof flashing, it may be possible to do a temporary repair using roof cement around the perimeter of the unit. While this can be used if a roofer cannot be contacted immediately, the best solution is to remove the shingles near the skylight and install a news properly.
Modern skylights have been designed by their manufacturers to make the window as simple as possible. As a backup to prevent leaks around skylights, during the installation process, roofers usually also install flashing which are lips to direct water away from the sealed area. It is a good idea to seal the skylight curb and surrounding roof area with a bituminous membrane.
Older bubble-type skylights that were mounted flush with the roof surface are notorious leakers because they relied entirely on sealants between shingles and the skylight. Newer curbed skylights are much more reliable.
Indoors, if the ceiling drywall is badly leaking, it is best to remove the damaged drywall material completely, remove any wet or stained fibreglass insulation, and clean the ceiling area. It is always best to get a professional contractor to do this, rather than a DYI project.

What Can You Do To Prevent Skylight Leak?

Many if not all skylight leaks can be prevented through seasonal roof inspection. A roofing contractor will look for damage to the shingles, and gutters, but will also check the flashings for holes, cracks, or other signs of damage or deterioration. They should also check the interior of the house for issues that could be causing your problems. It is best to schedule roof inspections during the Spring or Summer to make sure your home hasn’t sustained any damage during the harsher winter months.

Roofing Maintenance

Taking care of your roof with regular check-ups is a great way to prevent skylight leaks. Roof maintenance is especially important around winter time, more so than in other months because of the damage, the cold can do to the skylight and a roof in general. This is largely due to the threat of ice dams, which can cause costly damage.
First, after a particularly heavy snowstorm, you should clear your roof of snow as quickly as possible. Quick snow removal does not allow precipitation time to melt and refreeze on the roof, creating ice dams. Ice dams can block drainage to the point that moisture can seep into the home through the roof and skylight.

Adequate Ventilation

Another factor to consider with skylight leaks is the humidity level in the highest floor of your home. Too much humidity in the air, which can come from the laundry room or bathroom, can cause condensation on skylight glass while leading to leaks or even cracks around the frame. Ask your roofing contractor to suggest an appropriate ventilation system or dehumidifier for your home to prevent condensation.
If you hire an inexperienced roofing who is not familiar with skylight installation, then you can be in trouble down the road. If the skylight was installed on an older roof as a retrofit, and especially if the installer did not install the skylight properly, leaks at the skylight are likely. Always ask the roofer about their experience with skylights.

Hire a Professional Roofer to Help

Skylight leaks can be very difficult to repair, and we don’t recommend you do it yourself. If done poorly it can lead to significant interior and exterior damage. Instead, call for the advice of a professional. It will be cheaper in the long run and will prevent you from a lot of headaches.

Conclusion

If you notice leaks around your skylight, contact Cambie Roofing, a family owned & operated local roofing contractor with decades of experience in residential and commercial roofing. We’ll evaluate your skylight and surrounding shingles and recommend repairs that will fit your budget and remedy your water problems.

ventilation-asphalt-shingles

The Importance of Ventilation and Insulation in Asphalt Shingles

Roofs need the right balance of both ventilation and insulation to work properly, especially with the type of weather we’ve been having in Vancouver the past couple of ears. In warmer weather, poorly ventilated roofs can result in hot attic spaces which can significantly damage shingles, causing curling or even breaking, reducing the lifetime of a roof.

In the colder seasons, a lack of ventilation can trap cold air and cause moisture to build up, resulting in problems with mold, rot, and mildew, which can damage the roof and walls. Properly ventilated and insulated roofs upon are important to protecting against the problems caused by seasonal extremes and avoid costly repairs. Just think of the leaky condo crisis that cost Vancouver over $4 billion in damages because buildings didn’t have the proper ventilation.

While in Vancouver ventilation was a problem with newer buildings, it is usually common in older homes, which were generally constructed when building codes did not require as much insulation.
As many Vancouver builders discovered, creating the proper ventilation and insulation of asphalt shingle roofs is isn’t always easy. You need to get the advice of an experienced, licenced roofer to do the job correctly.

Roof Ventilation

Proper roof ventilation reduces electricity bills, extends shingle life, and prevents roof rot and ice dams in winter. Doing it right the first time also protects your house from expensive future repairs. The most important aspect of roof ventilation is to ensure your roof has vents so that the excessive moisture can escape. Ventilation is required by building codes. If you don’t properly ventilate your roof it will likely void your roofs warranty.

The number of vents within roof space will depend on the size of the roof and the material used, however, the general rule is that a single vent should be enough for a squared 30-meter roof space. A specific number of vents are required per square footage to ensure that the right amount of air enters and exits the attic.

Roof Insulation

Insulation plays a vital role in ensuring your home is properly ventilated. While you need to have enough insulation to help your house efficiently maintain a comfortable temperature, it is just as important t that you do not have too much insulation in case it blocks proper air circulation.

An experienced roofer or contractor can decide what your home needs and advice you on the proper course of action. Of course any work a roofer or building contractor does on the vents needs to be done carefully so you do not decrease the area of the vents or anyway stop the airflow.

You probably won’t notice if something is wrong with your roof’s insulation or ventilation which is why it’s important to have an experienced, trustworthy roofer do a checkup at least once a year. If there is a problem with the airflow, they will know and be able to fix it. Often the solution depends on what is causing the lack of airflow. In the simplest and least costly case, there may be something obstructing the vents which is an easy fix.

Unfortunately, in many cases, the lack of ventilation is caused by something more serious—such as a lack of or inappropriate placement of vents. If that’s the case, you might need to rip up a part or the complete roof to fix it.
Insulation placed on an air-sealed attic floor is simple, yet one of the most underappreciated building assemblies. A vented attic works in all types of climates to keep the home regulated.

Same, unexperienced builders do not install insulation correctly which causes excessive energy losses, ice dams, mold, rot which all need to be fixed sooner than it should.

If your builder has properly ventilated your roof space, then you will have to keep the vents free so they can allow for proper air flow. This means that the vents should not be obstructed otherwise the moisture will still stay trapped within the roof structure and eventually turn into mold and rot the wood.

Using Vents In Your Roof

There is a variety of different vents to select from when choosing a new vent for your roof. Two of the more common vents you will find are the box vent and turbine vents. The box vent uses natural air flow to draw hot air out of the attic; however they are not as effective as turbine vents and you will require more of them to properly ventilate your space. Turbine vents are wind-driven and more effective.

There is a third type of vent which are called ridge vents but they are not as common as the first two. They, as you might suspect, run along the ridge of your roof. They keep a more consistent temperature across your roof than box vents, and do not require wind to operate like turbines.

They are slightly more expensive, but when used with soffits, the underside of the area which connects the roof to the wall, they will keep your space well ventilated.

Conclusion

Whether you are in need a roof inspection or have a leaky, it’s important to choose a roofing contractor that is trustworthy, reliable, and experienced. At Cambie Roofing we are experts in providing you the service you need within your budget. Give us a call or email us for a free estimate.

solar-roofing

Is Solar Roofing Worth It?

Unfortunately, much of North American still runs on nuclear power, coal and other fossil fuels. If we could get a cleaner source of energy, for example solar power it would have a big impact on the environment.
You’ve seen solar power roofs in the news, most notably when Tesla made a big splash recently with an advanced panel system that is more efficient and more powerful than the traditional technology.
But how viable is solar power in Vancouver? The main challenge is that Vancouver tends to have too much cloud cover for much of the year, especially in the winter months when electricity is most in demand. The northern latitude of the city also means days are shorter and solar radiation is less intense which of course, means less sunlight is converted to energy.  When we look in comparison to some States like California, New Mexico and Arizona which are sunny all year round and demand is highest in the summer when power generation is at its peak, solar energy makes more sense.
But that doesn’t mean that solar power will never work in British Columbia and we should write it off totally.
Lets’ have a closer look at the technology and see if the technology is and can ever be useful in Vancouver.
What If You Want A Solar Panel?
If you believe solar power is the best option for you there are multiple variables to consider when seeking out the best solar panels on the market. While more high-end panels will have higher efficiency ratings than others, investing in the best solar equipment doesn’t always result in the higher savings. The only way to find the “sweet spot” for your home is to evaluate quotes with varying equipment and financing offers.
For any homeowner in the early stage of shopping for solar that would just like a ballpark estimate for an installation, do some research online before calling anyone. There are a lot of different tools to help you estimate long-term savings and the upfront costs. You will want to compare quotes from multiple companies and multiple sources before making a final decision.
How Much Does The Solar Panel System Cost?
While there aren’t a lot of companies to choose from in Vancouver, installation prices will vary significantly depending on the solar company you choose and the equipment you install. Keep in mind installing cheap solar panels might feel like the easiest way to save some cash and get rebates, your total savings will often be higher if you invest in top-of-the-line equipment.
Don’t forget to research the solar incentives and rebates available. In British Columbia they can reduce your net cost by 50 percent or even more. In addition, the Canada government offers a 30 percent solar tax credit. Do your research as cities like Nanaimo offer additional tax incentives.
Is Solar Power Worth it?
The average cost of solar power system in Canada is currently between $15,000 and $30,000 which is far more than the average Canadian is willing to pay. The average household uses 7,500 kilowatt-hours (kWh) but of course that changes on the time of year and the price of electricity. You can certainly save money if you plan on using solar power in the long run but you will have to do some calculations to figure out how much you spend on electricity to see if it’s worth it.
In some parts of the country, you can pay as little as 8 cents per kWh; in others, you’ll pay 20 cents or more. In British Columbia, you pay 8.29 per kWh for the first 1,350 kWh you use and 12.43 cents per kWh for everything above that.
When you go solar, you effectively install a small power plant on your roof to replace the electricity you get from B.C. Hydro. That means homeowners with high electricity rates from their utility are the ones who save the most when they switch to home solar power. For people who don’t want to rely on a centralized power source this may be important. If there is a black out and if you have a solar power generator you may not be effected.
Solar Power In Vancouver
If you want to install solar power because you want to reduce your carbon footprint there won’t be much difference if you live in British Columbia because over the long term, the carbon footprint of hydro power isn’t much different from solar. Hydro power uses water and floods entire valleys while solar panels requires large amounts of energy and toxic chemicals for the manufacturing process.
According to scientists, solar panels in a rooftop installation produce about 41 grams of CO2 equivalents per kilowatt hour over the lifetime of the system, mainly due to the energy required to manufacture the equipment while hydroelectricity produces 24 grams of CO2 equivalents per kilowatt hour.
Conclusion
For all solar electricity’s advantages, Vancouver is not the best place to install and use solar power. The technology really works best where there is more sun for longer periods of time. In addition, power is not very expensive, so you won’t get much savings.
That’s not to say that solar electricity will be a bad idea forever. The technology will improve and become more affordable so sometime in the future it might replace hydro power as B.C.s number one electracy source. More forward-thinking companies like Tesla will find creative solutions that will benefit cloudy cities like Vancouver.

sythetic_resin_roof_tile_wholesale

What is Synthetic Roofing and Should I Use it for My Home

  1. With the aid of modern technology and scientific innovations, it seems like there’s no limit to what synthetic materials can do. This, of course, includes roof materials. Synthetic roofing products include rubber, plastic, and polymer roofing have been developed to provide the colour, look, and even texture of natural materials like slate and wood without the heaviness and fragility of natural roof materials.

For many modern roofing systems, synthetic membranes are installed between the roof deck and the shingle to provide protection to the deck. The underlayment acts as an important second line of defense from leaks, storms, and ice damage which can save your home from costly repairs.
Traditional underlayment is commonly referred to as felt or tar paper, and is made of paper saturated in asphalt. Synthetic roofing is traditionally used in commercial and industrial buildings however you might consider synthetic membrane for your home because it generally lasts longer and provides better protection.

Types of roofing

Membrane roofing usually comprised of five layers which provide secured redundancy and improved durability for your roof. The woven scrim layer adds strength to prevent wrinkling and tears over time. The advanced back sheet adheres to the deck for easier installation for roofing contractors and provides an additional non-slip surface improved walkability.
Membrane roofing is a system of roofing traditionally used for flat or nearly flat roofs – roofs with less than a 14 degree slope. Here on the west coast of British Columbia, however, it’s a really good question as to why anyone would construct a building with a flat roof. More and more we’re seeing synthetic membranes on all types of residential roofing and with Vancouver’s heavy rainfall, synthetic membranes provide that extra protection you need.
Synthetic roof materials have been specially designed for optimal strength and durability. They’re also incredibly easy to maintain and many are fire-resistant. In fact, many synthetic materials are less expensive than their traditional roof material counterparts.
Many roofing material manufacturers are coming out with eco-friendly synthetic materials that emit the sun’s energy back into the atmosphere, reducing the cooling load on homes and businesses, as well as the heat-island effect in heavily populated areas. While perhaps not as important as in somewhere in California or down south, it can add an extra layer of protection in the hot summer months.

Types of Synthetic Membrane Roofing

Synthetic roof materials are generally made with propylene. Propylene is an organic compound. At room temperature, it is a gas. When mixed with other compounds it reacts and changes. This is one of the ways plastic is made.
These synthetic roofing materials are so neat not only for their green capabilities, but also because they can mimic the look of other types of materials including wood, slate, concrete, terra-cotta and more.
There are a few different types of membrane system is made. One is a synthetic rubber, also referred to as Thermoplastic where the rubber is welded together to create one large seamless membrane which provides protection.
Thermoplastic membranes are a type of synthetic rubber. The difference is that the seams of the roofing membrane overlap and they are bonded together by either melting or dissolving the membrane. The bonding process creates a seam that is as strong as the rest of the membrane roofing.
Another is the Modified bitumen which is a type of roof that really evolved from the traditional asphalt roofing system. The seams are joined together in a variety of ways. Heat is used to melt the asphalt and form a seal, a cold application can be used and there are several self-adhesive systems.
The last type or synthetic membrane roofing is called Thermoset. This type of membrane roof is made of large, flat pieces of synthetic rubber or similar materials. These pieces are bonded together at the seams to form one continuous membrane. Thermosets are widely used roofing materials due to their ability to withstand damaging effects of sun-rays and chemicals found on roofs

Advantages of Synthetic Roofing

Using synthetic membrane roofing has many advantages over asphalt roofing. Membrane roofing is far easier to create a perfect seal and a truly continuous membrane. All membrane roofing systems include properties that allow for expansion and contraction and UV resistance. With membrane roofing systems seams do not exist or are very strong. When the roofing system experiences expansion or contraction the roof does not form leaks or cracks in the membrane.
The fact of the matter is that there are many building in the Lower Mainland that use flat roofing. Traditionally the roofing system used has been tar and gravel roofing systems or asphalt.
This type of roofing can be loosely considered a membrane roofing system but it does have some disadvantages. In Vancouver we can experience freezing temperatures in the winter and this can damage the tar and gravel roofing system. Ice damns can form and this can prohibit water from flowing off the roof. Pooling water can lead to sagging which then leads to poor drainage overall.
Membrane roofing is an ideal solution for flat or nearly flat roofing systems. The membrane roofing is applied to the entire surface area and sealed to form a seamless barrier that prevents water from leaking in and helps to move water to drainage ports. Membrane roofing is made of a variety of synthetic materials. Commonly the roofing system is made of a synthetic rubber, thermoplastic or modified bitumen.

1. High Impact Resistance
2. Wind Resistance
3. Increased Fire Resistance
4. Resistance to Pollution
5. Longer Life Spans

Conclusion

While synthetic roofing has many advantages, it isn’t something that can be completed by an amateur roofing contractor. You need a professional who knows what they are doing which is why you should call Cambie Roofing. If you have any questions or need an estimate on your roof call the experts. At Cambie Roofing, we have been in business for over half a century – so we feel confident in saying we are your best roofing choice.

sythetic_resin_roof_tile_wholesale

What is Sythetic Roofing and Should I Use it for My Home

With the aid of modern technology and scientific innovations, it seems like there’s no limit to what synthetic materials can do. This, of course, includes roof materials. Synthetic roofing products include rubber, plastic, and polymer roofing have been developed to provide the colour, look, and even texture of natural materials like slate and wood without the heaviness and fragility of natural roof materials.
For many modern roofing systems, synthetic membranes are installed between the roof deck and the shingle to provide protection to the deck. The underlayment acts as an important second line of defense from leaks, storms, and ice damage which can save your home from costly repairs. Traditional underlayment is commonly referred to as felt or tar paper, and is made of paper saturated in asphalt. Synthetic roofing is traditionally used in commercial and industrial buildings however you might consider synthetic membrane for your home because it generally lasts longer and provides better protection.
Membrane roofing usually comprised of five layers which provide secured redundancy and improved durability for your roof. The woven scrim layer adds strength to prevent wrinkling and tears over time. The advanced back sheet adheres to the deck for easier installation for roofing contractors and provides an additional non-slip surface improved walkability.
Membrane roofing is a system of roofing traditionally used for flat or nearly flat roofs – roofs with less than a 14 degree slope. Here on the west coast of British Columbia, however, it’s a really good question as to why anyone would construct a building with a flat roof. More and more we’re seeing synthetic membranes on all types of residential roofing and with Vancouver’s heavy rainfall, synthetic membranes provide that extra protection you need.
Synthetic roof materials have been specially designed for optimal strength and durability. They’re also incredibly easy to maintain and many are fire-resistant. In fact, many synthetic materials are less expensive than their traditional roof material counterparts.
Many roofing material manufacturers are coming out with eco-friendly synthetic materials that emit the sun’s energy back into the atmosphere, reducing the cooling load on homes and businesses, as well as the heat-island effect in heavily populated areas. While perhaps not as important as in somewhere in California or down south, it can add an extra layer of protection in the hot summer months.
Types of Synthetic Membrane Roofing
Synthetic roof materials are generally made with propylene. Propylene is an organic compound. At room temperature, it is a gas. When mixed with other compounds it reacts and changes. This is one of the ways plastic is made.
These synthetic roofing materials are so neat not only for their green capabilities, but also because they can mimic the look of other types of materials including wood, slate, concrete, terra-cotta and more.
There are a few different types of membrane system is made. One is a synthetic rubber, also referred to as Thermoplastic where the rubber is welded together to create one large seamless membrane which provides protection.
Thermoplastic membranes are a type of synthetic rubber. The difference is that the seams of the roofing membrane overlap and they are bonded together by either melting or dissolving the membrane. The bonding process creates a seam that is as strong as the rest of the membrane roofing.
Another is the Modified bitumen which is a type of roof that really evolved from the traditional asphalt roofing system. The seams are joined together in a variety of ways. Heat is used to melt the asphalt and form a seal, a cold application can be used and there are several self-adhesive systems.
The last type or synthetic membrane roofing is called Thermoset. This type of membrane roof is made of large, flat pieces of synthetic rubber or similar materials. These pieces are bonded together at the seams to form one continuous membrane. Thermosets are widely used roofing materials due to their ability to withstand damaging effects of sun-rays and chemicals found on roofs
Advantages of Synthetic Roofing
Using synthetic membrane roofing has many advantages over asphalt roofing. Membrane roofing is far easier to create a perfect seal and a truly continuous membrane. All membrane roofing systems include properties that allow for expansion and contraction and UV resistance. With membrane roofing systems seams do not exist or are very strong. When the roofing system experiences expansion or contraction the roof does not form leaks or cracks in the membrane.
The fact of the matter is that there are many building in the Lower Mainland that use flat roofing. Traditionally the roofing system used has been tar and gravel roofing systems or asphalt. This type of roofing can be loosely considered a membrane roofing system but it does have some disadvantages. In Vancouver we can experience freezing temperatures in the winter and this can damage the tar and gravel roofing system. Ice damns can form and this can prohibit water from flowing off the roof. Pooling water can lead to sagging which then leads to poor drainage overall.
Membrane roofing is an ideal solution for flat or nearly flat roofing systems. The membrane roofing is applied to the entire surface area and sealed to form a seamless barrier that prevents water from leaking in and helps to move water to drainage ports. Membrane roofing is made of a variety of synthetic materials. Commonly the roofing system is made of a synthetic rubber, thermoplastic or modified bitumen.
• High Impact Resistance
• Wind Resistance
• Increased Fire Resistance
• Resistance to Pollution
• Longer Life Spans
Conclusion
While synthetic roofing has many advantages, it isn’t something that can be completed by an amateur roofing contractor. You need a professional who knows what they are doing which is why you should call Cambie Roofing. If you have any questions or need an estimate on your roof call the experts. At Cambie Roofing, we have been in business for over half a century – so we feel confident in saying we are your best roofing choice.

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Modified Bitumen Roofing Tips

What is Modified Bitumen Roofing?

Modified Bitumen is made from asphalt and a variety of rubber modifiers and solvents. It is the next evolution of asphalt roofing. In an application process the seams are heated to melt the asphalt together and create a seal. There is also hot-mopped application, similar to how conventional roofs are installed.

How Modified Bitumen Works

Modified bitumen can be installed overtop of an existing tar roof unlike rubber flat roofing, which can be eaten away. It is also very rugged and can sustain a fair amount of foot traffic.
Modified bitumen roofs involve some traditional materials, but use modern fabrication methods, and traditional or more contemporary installation techniques. Modified bitumen roofs are made from prefabricated rolls of modified asphalt or coal tar reinforced with a fiberglass or polyester reinforced mat. Rubber-modified asphalts, such as styrene-butadiene-styrene materials, are granular surfaced and are normally installed in two or more plies using mopping asphalt, cold adhesives, or torch welding. Plastic-modified asphalts such as atactic polypropylene systems are smooth or granular surfaced and can be heat welded or laid in cold adhesive.
Modified bitumen membranes combine the features of a built-up roof with the added strength from its polymer modification. Using a reinforced sheet that is prefabricated in the plant, modified bitumen systems require a less labor-intensive application than other types of roofing and can be applied in both commercial and residential roofs.
A modified bitumen roof is composed primarily of polymer-modified bitumen reinforced with one or more plies of fabric such as polyester, fiberglass or a combination of both. It can also include mineral granules, aluminum or copper. The bitumen determines the membrane’s characteristics and provides primary waterproofing protection, while the reinforcement adds strength, puncture resistance and overall system integrity.
A roofer will ensure modified bitumen membranes undergo strict quality control standards to ensure uniform thickness and consistent physical properties throughout the membrane. The finished roofing is usually two to four layers of modified bitumen membrane and a base sheet, with additional plies for added strength if needed. Usually if more layers are applied, the roof will last longer.

How to Identify Modified Bitumen

The best way to identify a Modified Bitumen roof is to look at the material edges. Modified bitumen roofing is thicker, and its edges are sealed by heating with a torch. You should see a little runout of melted bitumen at the material seams. If there is no runout the roof may have been adhered using some other method, but if it was “torched” it was not heated sufficiently and may be less durable.
Secondly, , it also is better at resisting tearing and breaking. If you find that it is easy to tear into the roof material edge it’s probably roll roofing not mod-bit.

Modified Bitumen Roofing Properties & Installation Methods

Most modified-bitumen roofs are torch-applied, although there are also self-adhesive and cold-process systems. The waterproofing membrane, sometimes called “single-ply modified,” consists of asphalt bitumen reinforced with a polyester or fiberglass fabric and modified with polymers to give it greater strength, flexibility, resistance to UV degradation, and resistance to heat and cold.
A variety of different chemical formulations have been tried over the years. It is best to stick to a product with an established track record. In general, modified-bitumen roofs can be applied to slopes as shallow as 1/4 inch per foot.
There are two main forms of modified bitumen roofing installation: the torch-down installation method, and a peel-and-stick installation.

Installation Methods for Modified Bitumen Roofs

A torch-applied, or torchdown, roof starts with a non-flammable base sheet made of asphalt-saturated felt or fiberglass that is mechanically attached to the roofing deck. In residential construction, the base sheet is usually attached with roofing nails driven through metal caps.
The second layer is the waterproofing membrane. This is heated with a torch as it unrolls, fusing it to the base sheet, to itself at seams, and to penetrations such as skylights. Installers must learn to heat the membrane so it is hot enough to fuse but not so hot as to burn through.
Membranes may be either smooth or have a granular surface like roll roofing. Smooth-faced membranes need a third coating, which has colored or reflective pigments to protect against UV radiation. The smooth type is preferable where foot traffic is expected or where decking is going over the roofing.
Torchdown roofing is self-flashing and uses no adhesives or solvents to seal around openings. The material can be run up parapets and abutting wall, and patches are used to seal around metal skylight curbs and similar openings. A special patching compound is used to seal to PVC stacks. If applied correctly, the torchdown membrane is essentially seamless.

Pros and Cons of Modified Bitumen Roofs

Bitumen roofs are very durable and are one of the longer lasting types of flat roofing materials, easily lasting 20 years or more. They are also easily repaired without solvents or adhesives, making it less expensive to maintain. It is compatible with asphalt shingles and asphalt compounds, although patching with roofing cement is not recommended. The reinforced fabric layer isolates the membrane above from building movement and gives the material enough strength to support occasional foot traffic.
The main drawback of modified bitumen roofing is the risk of fire during installation. While the risk of fire is low in the hands of trained installers, care must be taken when using torchdown on a wood-frame structure. A number of fires have started with sawdust that has accumulated in empty cavities, such as crickets and parapets.
Inspection of the roof for sawdust pockets while it is being framed is advised.

Typical Slopes for Modified Bitumen Roof Systems

Modified bitumen roofing is normally installed on low-slope roofing, up to 3 inches in slope, or depending on the application method, up to six inches of slope per foot may be permitted. Because there are quite a few approved installation methods, manufacturers typically use a alphameric roof application method name that encodes the basics of how the roof covering should be installed.

asphalt-shingles

Best Asphalt Shingles

What’s the Best Kind of Asphalt Shingle?

It can be a challenge knowing what the best type of asphalt shingle is out there. There are so many different types and styles to choose from and everybody seems to be promising the moon.
In this blog post we’re going to show you what’s on the market and then you can decide what is best for your home.

The Key Components of Every Shingle

The major factors that are important to a homeowner and builder when choosing a roofing shingle are: price, wind ratings, life expectancy, and colour selection. These are all extremely important issues, but there are other things to consider as well such as how was the shingle made, the weight of the material, how wide is the nailing strip, pitch of the roof the shingle will be installed on, what type of warranty does the shingle carry, and what type of wind rating does it carry. When you purchase a new roof you want a shingle that is going to be aesthetically appealing on your home, but will also perform well in the type of weather your particular city or region experiences.
There are two primary types of asphalt shingle, fiberglass and organic. Both are popular choices that should satisfy the needs of most homeowners. Here’s what you need to know about each one.

Organic Asphalt Shingles

Organic shingles consist of formerly living materials such as paper, wood, and cellulose that are melded with adhesive asphalt to create a solid core. These shingles are tremendously durable in snow and cold weather, so they’re a popular choice in Canada, northern United States, as well as higher elevations. The reason for this durability is their composites which includes more asphalt than fiberglass, which makes them heartier. The major downsides are that they’re prone to warping. They’re more expensive, and they’re heavier.
Organic shingles are the more traditional roofing solution with fiberglass ascending in popularity in recent years. The layman won’t notice much difference between the types, especially when you stare at your roof from ground level. The basic appearance is still the same despite the underlying chemical compound.

Fiberglass Shingles

Fiberglass shingles are a newer roofing solution. Fiberglass glass mats compose the makeup of these shingles. In addition to being cheap to manufacture, they are remarkably durable and a higher quality than most shingles. This makes sense, because fiberglass at its core is a highly compressed type of glass filament woven into huge patterns to create incredibly dense material. A fiberglass shingle is lighter, thinner, and more eco-friendly. It’s also more resistant to fire if disaster ever strikes in your home. The primary negative is that they contain less asphalt since the composition is structured to take advantage of the fiberglass.

Different Colours of Shingles

You can choose any style and colour which can reflect your personality and individual tastes, but keep in mind the resale value of your home is always a priority. Don’t pick something that doesn’t fit in with the rest of your home or neighbourhood. When you list your house, if you have something not in style, it can make it more difficult to sell.
Choosing classic colours such as white and black may seem boring, but each has a hidden purpose. If you’re living in a colder area, you can enhance the energy efficiency of your home through something as simple as shingle colour scheme. By picking black, you’ll have to run your heat less frequently in the winter.
Similarly, people in warmer climates should buy white shingles to reduce their dependency on air conditioning. You also have other colours to choose from like brown and gray. Choose a colour that complements your exterior paint colour, not one that you’ll regret in a couple of years.

Different Shingle Styles

With considering shingles, evaluate the overall design of your home. If you have a simple, elegant style with your exterior home design, your shingles present an opportunity to add some splash to the proceedings. On the flipside, if your home is a bit busy, you should dial back your roof cover to prevent distracting from the other, more daring choices.
No matter what you decide in terms of colour and style, there’s one aspect to keep in the back of your mind. You should examine your potential shingles in all manners of light. You don’t want to pay for the installation only to realize that your roof looks less attractive during certain parts of the day. At that point, you’re stuck with it no matter how much the situation bothers you.

So Which One Is Best?

Organic and fibreglass shingles look the same. They’re both made from asphalt and granules and they’re installed exactly the same way too. Fibreglass shingles usually hold up better if a roof has poor ventilation.
Proper ventilation means the temperature difference is minimized between the attic and air outside. This prolongs the life of your roof. It also eliminates moisture that can get trapped inside the attic. If moisture stays there, it can lead to rot and mold.
There are plenty of different shingle products out there. Most homeowners choose based on their budget, but like everything else, you get what you pay for so be careful.
Compared with other shingle materials, asphalt is inexpensive which makes them popular. Most roofs have them but they’re not as durable as other types of shingles.
Some fibreglass shingles come with a 50-year warranty. They’re also more fire-resistant than organic Consider hiring a professional roofer before making a final decision. They have decades of experience, so they can aid you in avoiding rookie mistakes when you choose the colour, style, and type of shingles.

Conclusion

The undertaking of building a new roof is substantial. There are a lot of pitfalls to avoid, but if you use the information above, you should have no problem finding the shingle type, style and colour that best suits your house. While price is always a key consideration in such massive home renovations, the reality is that the cost of shingles is relatively static, especially by the ordinary standards of exterior equipment. This liberates you to go with your heart rather than your wallet during the decision-making process.

Residential Roofing

Best Types of Roofs

In this blog post we’re going to cover the best types of roofs for your residential or commercial building.
Whether you are building your roof from scratch or patching up your existing roof a wide range of materials and types are readily available. But which one is the best for your home?
There are many types and materials to choose from which include asphalt, wood, and composite shingles, as well as slate, concrete, and clay tiles. Cost is an important factor, but it’s not the only one. Style, material weight, and installation requirements should also influence your selection. Lastly, you want your roof to blend in well with the neighbourhood. If you build a flat roof in a neighbourhood of cedar roofs, it can cause your house to stick out like a sore thumb.

Cost

A number of considerations will affect the cost of a new roof. The price of the material is the starting point, but other factors also must be considered. One is the condition of the existing roof if you are remodeling a house. If old materials must be stripped off, and if the supporting structure needs repair, that can be costly. The shape of the roof is another contributing factor. A gable roof with few or no breaks in its planes makes for a simple roofing job. A house with multiple chimneys, intersecting rooflines, turrets, skylights, or other elements will cost significantly more to roof. It’s always important to get an estimate before starting any work.

Materials

Not every roofing material can be used on every roof. A flat roof or one with a low slope may demand a surface different from one with a steeper pitch. Materials like slate and tile are very heavy, so the structure of many homes is inadequate to carry the load. Consider the following options, then talk with your roofer and get an estimate for the job.

Asphalt Shingles

This is the most commonly used of all roof materials, probably because it’s the least expensive and requires a minimum of skill to install. It’s made of a fiberglass medium that’s been impregnated with asphalt and then given a surface of sand-like granules. Two basic configurations are sold: the standard single-thickness variety and thicker, laminated products. The standard type costs roughly half as much, but laminated shingles have an appealing textured appearance and last roughly half as long.

Wood

Wood was the main choice for centuries, and it’s still a good option. Usually made of cedar, redwood, or pine, shingles are sawn or split. They have a life expectancy in the 25-year range but cost an average of twice as much.

Metal

Aluminum, steel, copper, copper-and-asphalt, and lead are all durable—and expensive—roofing surfaces. Lead and the copper/asphalt varieties are typically installed as shingles, but others are manufactured for seamed roofs consisting of vertical lengths of metal that are joined with solder. These roofs start at about $250 per square but often cost two or three times that.
Tile and Cement. The half cylinders of tile roofing are common on Spanish Colonial and Mission styles; cement and some metal roofs imitate tile’s wavy effect. All are expensive, very durable, and tend to be very heavy.

Slate

Slate is not very common in Vancouver. However, is among the most durable of all roofing materials. Not all slate is the same but the best of it will outlast the fasteners that hold it in place. Hundred-year-old slate, in fact, is often recycled for reinstallation, with the expectation it will last another century. But slate is expensive and very heavy.

Types of Roofs

Once you pick your material, you have to pick the style of roof you want. There are many different types but we have narrowed it down to three different types. The styles of roofs vary depending on area and taste.

Gable Roof

Gable roof designs are one of the simpler and most common styles when it comes to roofs. The gable roof style looks like an upside down. There are numerous advantages to the gable roof style. First, its simple design makes it easier to construct and less expensive than alternative roof types. There is also available space underneath the roof, allowing for an attic or a more open concept. Gable roof structures easily shed water and snow which makes them great for areas with heavy snowfall such as Canada. The steep pitch of gable roofs allows for excellent water drainage and fewer leaks. They also allow for more ventilation, and provide more space for an attic or vaulted ceilings.

Sawtooth Roof

A Sawtooth roof is two or more parallel pitched roofs in which the sloped and vertical surfaces alternate. As the name suggests, the roof resembles the side of a saw blade or a graph line. Sawtooth roofs were once only used in industrial buildings. However, now they have become trendy and are now used in modern home design.
They are very chic looking, this design can have windows placed in the vertical spaces of the roof, allowing more natural light inside the home. The higher peaks provide the opportunity for either attic, vaulted ceilings or loft living space. The combination of the various slopes and use of natural light make this design an excellent choice for homes with Eco-friendly conveniences, geothermal, solar panels, and radiant heating systems.

Flat Roof

Flat roofs are common especially with commercial buildings but can be used on residential homes as well. They are definitely the most simple roof to construct because they have little to no pitch. The most common types of systems used with flat roofs are rubber. By far the biggest advantage of using a flat roof is the expense. From the initial building and installation to the materials most often used to cover the roof, flat roofs are fairly cheap.

Choosing the Right Roof

More often than not, if you are remodeling, the existing roof of your house will determine your choice of roofing material. Should you be considering other options, you’ll want to consider not only the cost but the color, texture, weight, and durability of your alternatives, as well as what traditionally has been used on houses like yours.
Originally published on November 15th 2017, updated on March 1st 2021