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2023 Roofing Trends You Don’t Want To Miss

2023 Roofing Trends You Don’t Want To Miss

Techniques used to shelter and shield against the elements have been around since the beginning of human existence. As humans have evolved, their sheltering methods have also improved drastically. This goes all the way back to when mankind stopped sheltering in caves and began making structured shelters with roofs. Today, we rely heavily on advanced building techniques. Our condos, single-family homes, apartment complexes and townhouses all have something in common – roofs. Over the years, some roofing techniques have failed while others have proven to work. Luckily for home owners today, there are various roofing techniques to choose from based on a person’s budget, taste and geographical location. Cambie Roofing has compiled a list of roofing trends you won’t want to miss in 2023.

Solar Shingles

It’s 2023 which means being environmentally friendly is in style! Solar shingles are gaining popularity quickly among homeowners looking to make less of an environmental impact as well as bring value to their home. This type of shingle is not to be confused with solar panels which are also very popular across North America. Solar shingles are relatively new to the industry which has its ups and downs. They come from photovoltaic sheets which once installed, will collect electricity from sunlight. Solar shingles look relatively similar to normal shingles and based on how they are installed, they can give the outside of your home a modernized feel. While solar shingles are designed to lower electricity bills, the costs of the initial installation can be out of reach for many homeowners. These costs are expected to continue to lower as solar shingles become more available and common.

Synthetic Thatch

If you’re in need of a vacation somewhere warm, you’re not alone! Luckily, there are ways to make your home feel more tropical and you can achieve that through synthetic thatch roofs. While this trend might not be for everyone, it sure does make a statement for those willing to try it out. Originally, thatch roofs consisted of dried straw, reeds, palm tree branches and other types of vegetation. This historic style of roofing has been around since before the 11th Century and remained popular until the Industrial Revolution when it began getting replaced with other techniques that used materials such as slate. Today, thatching remains a low-cost roofing technique in rural areas and third world countries and it is also used in tropical climates and places looking to make less of an environmental impact. As a homeowner, you can achieve the same beautiful and tropical look of a thatch roof using synthetic materials that don’t pose fire threats. Are you adventurous enough to try this rustic yet urban trend out in 2023?

Green Roof Trends

In today’s day and age, being eco-friendly is something many homeowners strive for especially with large issues such as climate change and the rising costs of living looming over their heads. Green roofs which are largely popular in European countries are gaining traction here in North America, especially in condensed urban areas that lack green spaces. Green roofs can be installed on both residential and commercial buildings, offering plenty of social and private benefits to owners and people nearby. The installation process of a green roof will include water-proofing, drainage and a root repellent system, and based on the type of green roof installed, some will incorporate irrigation systems. There are so many benefits to having a green roof including the fact that they actually lower energy costs since they act as insulation which in turn, moderates your home’s temperature. Another great benefit to green roofs is they promote clean air and absorb carbon dioxide. In addition to this, they’re very stylish and can transform boring urban buildings into beautiful green spaces while also offering agricultural opportunities and habitat for native species.

Metal Roof Trends

If you’re not the type of person to invest in a wild trend like synthetic thatch, you might be more interested in a modern metal roof. In recent years, metal roofs have become available in a multitude of colors and styles so there are options for homeowners looking to make a statement or those wishing to keep it simple. One of the biggest benefits of having a metal roof is its durability and long lifespan. Metal roofs don’t curl up and break apart like shingles do over time. They also do exceptionally well in harsh weather conditions which is something that homeowners need to consider living in North America. As they’ve become more popular, manufacturers have discovered ways to keep metal roofs from being overly noisy compared to other roofing materials. Unfortunately, metal roofs can be on the more expensive side which may deter some homeowners from investing in the technology.

Conclusion

The current roofing trends have one thing in common – a focus on the environment. So much so that standard shingles are starting to be manufactured with reflective coating in order to reduce the amount of heat being absorbed by peoples homes. Whether you’re looking to install a new roof on your current home or you’re in the process of choosing a roof for a new build, there are so many 2023 roofing trends you don’t want to miss!

common roofing terms

Roofing Terminology: A Guide to Common Roofing Terms

Give a step forward learning common roofing terms in advance! Replacing or fixing your roof means that you’re about to hear industry-specific terms from the roofing contractor.
Yes, you’re most probably unfamiliar with most of these terms, but you can always ask the roofer to expound. Nevertheless, it’s helpful to learn some roofing terminologies on your own so that you won’t feel overwhelmed. All it takes is to read this guide.

Common Roofing Terms

There are thousands of roofing terms, and one post isn’t enough to tackle them all. So, we stick to the most common ones for the typical property owner. It makes sense to start with the five popular roofing options in North America:

Asphalt Roof

Shingles made from asphalt are by far the most preferred residential roofing material in this part of the world.
Fiberglass reinforces the new iteration for extended life. Fortunately, the price remains competitive, which is why an asphalt roof never goes out of style.

Wood and Cedar Shake

Wood shingles are as competitive as asphalt in pricing, but its advantage is its aesthetic value. In other words, it looks more pleasing than the conventional asphalt roof, thanks to the rustic and natural appearance.

Metal Roof

Roofs in metal are better to resist extreme weather all year. As metal is resilient and resistant to severe conditions, i.e., snow, strong winds, and torrential rain. Metal roofs in North America come in two styles: shingles and panels. The material composition can be aluminum, copper, stainless steel, and zinc.

Tile and Slate

Tile and slate make for an ideal customized and DIY roof as they’re versatile and come in a handful of colours. Unlike asphalt and metal, tile and slate roofing materials are light enough for a DIY enthusiast or a handyman to install.

Rubber

The purpose of a roof made from rubber material is to mimic the asphalt shingle. It’s the newest roofing material available in North America and is causing quite the stir because of its competitive price and durability.
Aside from the types of roof, there’s a handful of common terms in roofing you should know:

1. Course

Refers to a row of shingles or other roofing materials that run horizontally across the structure’s length.

2. Decking

The roof’s decking is a sheet material usually made from plywood. It is attached to the rafters, which in turn is found in the attic. The decking serves as the host for other roofing materials, i.e., shingles and underlayment.

3. Downspout

This part of the roof comes in the form of a pipe installed to the building’s sides. Its purpose is to direct water from the gutters and away from the structure.

4. Drip Edge

It’s an L-shaped metal strip situated along the edges of the roof. It allows the water to drip, preventing a possible buildup in the eaves, siding, and decking. The drip edge is also responsible for preventing moisture penetration in the fascia boards.

5. Chalk

In roofing, chalk refers to a powdered residue applied on the surface of a material.

6. Chalk Line

It is a line purposely made on the roofing structure by snapping a cord wrapped in coloured chalk. Depending on the roof material, some contractors use a taut string instead. The idea of a chalk line is to provide a guide for alignment purposes.

7. Chalking

The term pertains to the degradation of a chemical ingredient used in roofs, such as coating and paint.

8. Chimney

The chimney is a structure that projects through and above the roof for aesthetic and practical purposes. Wood, stone, metal and masonry are the most common materials to build chimneys.

9. Fascia

Those boards exposed on the roof eaves or overhang’s front edge make up the fascia. The boards are typically made from wood, vinyl, or aluminum. The gutters can’t be adequately installed without the fascia.

10. Flashing

The flashing is a sheet metal material that prevents water from penetrating through the projection and intersections in a roofing system.
Contractors install flashing to protect the chimneys, valleys, joints, vent pipes, and other parts of the roof where water naturally finds its way through.

11. Gutter

The gutters are troughs embedded in the fascia board. Guttering is crucial for collecting water run-off from the roof, leading to the downspouts and the ground.

12. Ice Dam

This describes a condition in which the combination of ice and snow thaws and re-freezes at the roof’s lower edge.
Ice dams cause water to back up and collect under the shingles. The pressure created by the buildup of water causes leaks and extensive water damage if not addressed.

13. Overhang

“Overhang” is the part of the roof which extends beyond the exterior walls of the building or house.

14. Rafters

The rafter provides support to the roof. It is the one you see in an unfinished ceiling of an attic. As raffers are attached to the roof deck, they play a critical role.

15. Ridge

The ridge describes the top edge of a couple of intersecting sloping roof surfaces.

16. Valley

The roof valley is an area where two adjoining sloped planes meet. It’s easy to spot since it creates a “V-shaped” depression on the roof.
Knowledge of common roofing terms comes in handy when you’re venturing on a repair, installation, or replacement project.
It protects you from getting ripped off by a mischievous roofer, and it helps you find the best roofing contractor by sharing educated conversations with them.